the emperor wears socks with sandals

There’s something freeing about lounging around the apartment in one’s unmentionables. Why is this? My theory is that it’s liberating. It’s new. Even if we were created without clothes, I think there is a part of a person that feels free, vulnerable, fresh, and dangerous when he or she is wearing the Emperor’s new clothes. Why has the human body been deemed disgusting?
I’m not advocating public nudity. I am honestly wondering why we don’t often question clothing in private. What is so dangerous about being alone, sock-skating around the living room playing air guitar with no shirt or pants on?

Are we afraid of exposing ourselves in other ways than just physically? Do we feel worried that someone will discover our freedom? Or maybe it’s that we’re afraid of discovering it for ourselves.

I think there’s a difference between inappropriate exposure of one’s body and simply being comfortable outside of social requirements. Why do I have to wear the same thing lounging on my couch as I do to work? Why do some women wear bras to bed?

Perhaps it’s a gender issue. We often see men without shirts on or sporting an undershirt without a care in the world. And that’s in public! So what about in private? What about women? What do we do?

I know a woman who feels naked without a full caked on face of makeup. I know another girl who wouldn’t even dream of going 5 minutes without a bra. How does she shower? the world may never know.

So is it a gender thing? Is it a shyness issue? If so, why are we shy of our own natural bodies? Why do women at the age of 20 still not know their own anatomy? What has made us scared to see ourselves?

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5 thoughts on “the emperor wears socks with sandals

  1. I think it just depends on whether or not you have lived alone. Basically when you live alone, your entire appartment/house is your bedroom/bathroom. There is no reason to close doors, no reason to wear clothes, no reason for anything because nobody is watching. For those that go from living at home to living with roomies to living with a spouse, habbits are most likely formed wich are comforting since that is all they have ever known.

  2. Culture is a key factor. Morality is often imposed socially/culturally. In some parts of the world nudity (at least partial) is deemed natural. In other places a woman is expected to wear ankle-lenghth dresses and doilies on their head while men cover it all up with suits. Who’s more moral? Ya can’t tell by the clothes.

  3. jennifer: well i think winter does have something to do with it ;) but otherwise…. :D

    Tim: Having gone from family home to dorm to roomies in an apartment to living alone (and all kinds of interesting things in between)… i think those habits are pretty much set like you mentioned. But I think because I live alone I’m beginning to realize that it’s my place and I can make it what I want. Strange how it has taken me so long to get that mentality…

    storbakken: I agree that it’s very cultural. It reminds me of how shocked I was when I was younger when I saw National Geographic features on tribes in Africa who hold clothing/nudity/body image to a completely different standard. That’s the first major “culture shock” I remember in my life.

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